Also in the category of “even if @StephenCurry30 is right, he made one of himself by saying so” . . .

In the category of “@BarackObama was an ass, too, but it wasn’t politically correct to say so” . . .

Steph Curry has generally shown himself to be among the highest class within the NBA. When he was asked about the comments the CEO of UnderArmour made complimenting Trump, however, Curry made an ass of himself, by calling Trump an ass. Curry generally takes the high ground when addressing controversial topics in answering questions from reporters. He could have done that in this case, too, by simply expressing his disagreement. Instead, he took the bait, swallowed it whole, and shot it straight out the other end. Instead of being a unifier, a peacemaker, Curry lashed out. In doing so, he fell into the trap of demonstrating the very thing that opponents of Trump have accused him and his supporters of all along: hate.

It is ironic, don't you think, that the group continually pointing the finger of accusation has demonstrated more animosity than the other side? I have friends who voted for Obama twice. Some of them regret it; some would do it again if given the chance. I have friends who voted for Hillary Clinton, and I have friends who voted for Donald Trump. (I voted for neither.) As a relatively impartial observer, I can tell you that it is not the ones in my experience who voted for Trump who show the most animosity, disdain, and outright rudeness. That award goes to his opponents. I love to criticize Trump, in part because he is sometimes an ass. But frankly, so is Hillary and so is the most beloved Obama. In fact, Obama was such an ass that he didn't need to talk like one for you to know it. He simply behaved like one by showing contempt for the U.S. Congress, the Press, and—worst of all—the American People. Obama proved himself an ass over and over by insulting allies and cozying up to enemy dictators, by defending perpetrators and ignoring the innocent, by ignoring the Constitution and creating his own laws by mere presidential decree.

Curry, who apparently has developed a friendship with Obama, has a right to express his disagreement with the CEO of UnderArmour. And to his credit, Curry was asked a question to which he responded; he didn’t simply grab the mike (as it were) and go on a rant. He could have vomited his opinions against Trump the way his coach has done. But in one way, what Curry did was actually worse, despite the outward restraint, because Curry issued a not-very-subtle threat that his very popular, very valuable face (my words, not his) might go somewhere besides UnderArmour if the CEO kept this stuff up (again, my words, not his). This threat is actually far worse than the name-calling. I won’t take the time to go in to all of the examples of those on Curry’s side in this discussion who have insulted and made fun of those who disagree and say things like, “Well, maybe I’ll just stop listening to your show”—or the like. If you’re not aware of this phenomenon, you’re not paying attention (and I’m not implying that you should be). Boycotting is a perfectly acceptable form of protest. I think it is often misapplied (by both sides), but just because a sound principle is misapplied doesn’t mean the principle ceases to be sound. What is not acceptable, however, is for one side to make fun of the other side for boycotting and then turn around and boycott something else. When Curry called Trump an ass, he made an ass of himself; when he threatened UnderArmour, he did as one older gentleman described to me many years ago, “This is what we call showing your ass.”